Tag Archive | Yosemite

National Park Service Manages To Regain Ionic Yosemite Names Like ‘Curry Village’ & ‘Ahwahnee Hotel’ — Albeit For $3.8 Million!

by Anura Guruge


Click to access the ‘LA Times’ story.


This is GREAT News.

Shame that it cost the National Park Service $3.84 Million. They are short of funds.

This should never have been allowed to happen in the first place.

I wrote about this, in reference to beloved ‘Curry Village‘, after my last visit in 2016.

Good News. The Park Service owns the names now.


Click to access my post.


It all had to do with who owned these iconic names like ‘Curry Village’. The National Park Service had not made an effort, in the past, to make sure that they owned them. That was the problem.

The prior Concession Holder to the Park held the rights to the name and only now parted with them after a total payoff coming to $12 million.

But, the National Park Service will, in essence, own the names going forward. That is GREAT news.

But, this issue is happening or going to happen in other Parks too. Concession Holders ‘trademarking’ iconic park names. The Park Service has to stop this.


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by Anura Guruge


25 Rare Vintage Photos Of America’s National Parks by “Reader’s Digest”.

by Anura Guruge


Click image to access the Reader’s Digest article with the pictures.


I thought you might enjoy them.

This was MY favorite. I visited ‘Curry Village‘ at Yosemite in 1992. In 2016 it was GONE!

Click to ENLARGE and read here.


Click to access my post about the renaming of the iconic ‘Curry Village’.


Well, enjoy.


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by Anura Guruge


The Government Has To STOP Persecuting The Navajos At Canyon de Chelly!

by Anura Guruge


Click IMAGES to ENLARGE.


2015: Navajos permitted to sell on the pavement &
sell art featuring the local stone from the Canyon.


One of the paintings on stone shown above —
which we bought.

Notice the thickness of the stone.


Other example of paintings on stone.


The persecution of the Navajo at Canyon de Chelly by U.S. government authorities, now in the form of the National Park Service, is still happening — on an accelerating basis.

They are getting pushed around. The Navajo Nation is not doing much to protect them. They do not have the skills, experience & the resources to take on the Park Service. Plus, they are petrified of harassment at the personal-level. Being barred from access to the Canyon — chief among them.

It is true that they are no longer being shot, made to undergo ‘Long Walks’ or have their children forcefully send to Christian boarding schools. But, nonetheless, the persecution is cruel and hurtful.

Between our visit in April 2015 and our recent trip at the end of July, THREE very specific attacks have take place.

  1. Navajos can no longer display their wares for sale to the tourists on the ground or on tables. Their displayed good have to be on a parked vehicle. So, if they have a truck they can use the tailgate. Many do NOT have trucks. So, they put towels on the hood and trunk of their cars and display their wares that way.
     …..
  2. Navajos can no longer sell any art featuring stone from the Canyon. They have to use purchased slate.
    ……
  3. The Park Service is threatening to stop them living in the National Monument part of the Canyon.
    …..

This persecution in inane and very distressing.

In the end this is THEIR land. What is left of all the land that used to be theirs by right.

Having them sell their art and jewelry from the ground or tables did NO harm. They did NOT get in the way. This is not the Grand Canyon or Yosemite. The car parks are rarely packed. Plus the Navajos provide a VALUABLE service — since you will never find or see a Park Ranger on the Rims. The Navajos acts as FREE guides and narrators.

As for the stone … What can you say. Yes, I agree that nobody should be allowed to chisel any new stone from the Canyon. But, there are tons of stone lying around. And here is where it gets crazy and very frustrating. There are NO such restrictions re. stone at ‘Monument Valley‘ and that is Navajo land too. Difference, NO Park Service.

They say they want to build a pavilion in which the Navajo can sell their wares. They have one of those at ‘Monument Valley’. It is EMPTY!

Monument Valley. The EMPTY shops in the ‘pavillion’.

 


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by Anura Guruge

The “Acadia National Park” Proposed Traffic Limitation Plan — The OFFICIAL YouTube Videos.

by Anura Guruge



These are ‘National Park Service‘ produced videos. I came across them thanks to Twitter. [As to why they split it into three, I do not know.]

Whether you had heard of the proposed ‘Acadia National Park‘ traffic limitation (in reality mitigation) plan or not, these videos are worth watching. They graphically illustrate the traffic problem that they are trying to deal with.

I can empathize though we typically manage to avoid the traffic.

As regulars here know, we try to make it to Acadia at least twice a year — and have already made one trip in 2018, i.e., in early March. We have visited 10-times since 2013.

We usually go in late June and early September — though we have also been there in July. The June and Sept. times we go are NOT peak-peak. Plus, I now know my way around, am familiar with the back routes and also know when the crowds will be.

I am also aware that Yosemite already has a similar reservation plan. I think that it is kind of inevitable. Maybe, as some had already feared a few years ago, the whole park may become BUS-ONLY (like the Western part of the Grand Canyon).

Not sure how they can partition the ‘Ocean Drive’ section of the ‘Loop Road‘ since it is a one-way.

I can’t say I am opposed to the need for some traffic regulation. But, I am hoping that it won’t impact me too greatly since I am willing to travel off-peak.

Anywho …

You should watch these videos. Well worth it. Well produced.


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Category ‘Acadia’.


by Anura Guruge

California Wine Country Wildfires Most Likely Will Majorly Spike Wine Prices.

by Anura Guruge


Just Examples. Google for more, much more.

** ** ** ** ** 



While the human and animal tragedy is palpable and immense, it is NOT as churlish as it may first appear to start thinking about what this is going to do for wine prices. To be fair it was 11-year old Teischan who got me thinking about it as we were watching the news. It resonates with her, to an extent, in that we were in San Francisco & Yosemite area last year, in April.

The economy of that area, as we know, is inexorably linked to wine. Appears that even prior to these devastating fires there had been some major concerns about this year’s crop because of Summer heat that withered the vines. Appears that the crop was down even ahead of the destruction caused by the fires. Plus, the ashes left on the ground can have an impact on the taste of grapes for years to come!

Wine does make a noticeable contribution to the Californian — and thus — U.S. economy. A marked drop in wine revenues will have a ripple effect.

Wine prices at the consumer level are bound to go up and I am not sure whether other countries will be willing to bail us out. This, whichever way you look at it, is not good news for wine lovers — such as I.


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by Anura Guruge

FREE Christmas Trees For 4th Graders Through The Wonderful U.S. Government “Every Kid In A Park” Program.

by Anura Guruge


everykidinpark

Click to access the official “.gov” Website for this wonderful program. We used it, gainfully, last year.


freechristmastree

The official announcement of the FREE Christmas trees. Click image to access official “.gov” Website.


Available in New Hampshire too!

freechristmastreenh

Click to get more details from NECN.


The “Every Kid In A Park” is a wonderful program — a worthwhile use of OUR tax dollars.

We lucked out last year, 2015 – 2016 School Year to be precise. Teischan was a 4th grader. I printed out the forms online.

We, as a family, went to Yosemite, Kings Canyon & Sequoia National Parks, in April 2016, using her free pass. She lost her pass when our rented SUV was broken into in San Francisco.

When we went to Acadia National Park, in July, for the Centenary, I got her another pass. No hassle — as long as she was a 4th grader.

So, I am an avid supporter of this program.

This free Christmas tree deal is another winner. A great promotion. I am delightedPass this information along.

All 4th Grade teachers should make a point of explaining this to their kids.

[Some, for reasons that escape me, are reluctant. I tried to get Teischan’s teacher to tell the other kids about this program BEFORE the Summer vacation. She never did!]

 


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by Anura Guruge

“Lost River Gorge & Boulder Caves”, New Hampshire — Quite The Attraction, Quite The Adventure.

by Anura Guruge


Click pictures to ENLARGE.

All taken with my Fuji X-E2s.

Attribution WILL be enforced.







Wow. Wow. Wow. What a great place. Quite the adventure. Has to be New Hampshire’s most underrated tourist attraction (and that coming from a ‘Lifetime Member’ “Granite State Ambassador“). I, of course, must have seen signs to it given that it is “off Loon” — and we go to Loon (i.e., Lincoln) at least once a year (four times so far this year). It never registered as something real fun to do. I actually found it while checking out, online, the “Flume Gorge” — as a potential place to take Teischan (last Tuesday) while Deanna and Devanee went ‘back to school‘ shopping. The word that caught my interest was ‘CAVES’. Teischan just loves the “Polar Caves” — for nothing else but the caves. Since this was for Teischan I decided I will give “Lost River” a spin. And am I glad I did so.

Very impressed. Loved it. Has it all. Scenery, waterfalls, caves (with running water inside), bridges, hummingbirds, foliage, real oil lamps (and it is lovely to smell the oil inside the caves) flowers …

Reminded me of Acadia. Reminded Teischan of Yosemite (and to be fair it has quite a few similarities to the adjoining “Kings Canyon National Park” that we did visit during our trip to Yosemite in April). Very sylvan.

Different to “Polar Caves“. The main difference being that “Polar Caves”, in the main”, is a cliffside adventure while “Lost River” is all inside an immersive gorge — with the sight and sound of rushing water never far away. The caves are very different too. “Lost River” caves are deeper, HARDER TO NAVIGATE and has some lovely water features inside them. Teischan loved them — especially the fairly large waterfall.

You DEFINITELY have to crawl on your hands and KNEES, belly to the ground! My pants were filthy. Makes “Polar Caves” feel like a walk in a very open park. I couldn’t get past the ‘Go-NO Go’ Lemon Squeezer Gauge — though I didn’t try too hard to make it (given that at nearly 63 years of age I know my limitations). After that I gave the last 3 caves a miss. I had done enough crawling for the day.

Teischan loved it. Claims it is her new favorite.

This does NOT mean that you should not bother with “Polar Caves”. BUT, if due to time or budget you can ONLY do one then it should be “Lost River”. SMILE.



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by Anura Guruge


National Parks 100th Birthday, i.e., Centennial, Is Just For The ‘Park Service’ — Not Any Famous Parks.

by Anura Guruge


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Click to access “National Park Service” (NPS) 100th Birthday celebration page. They do point out correctly that this is all about the August 25, 1916 CREATION of the ‘Park Service’.


And President Obama visited 2 National Parks
to mark the upcoming Centennial.

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Click image to access the original “Voice of America” coverage.


To be fair the National Park Service (NPS), in general, has done a good job pointing out that this 100th Birthday celebrations relate to the CREATION of the Park Service than any of the famous National Parks.

They do, however, as I have already pointed out subscribe to this — THOUGH that is wrong! Acadia only became a National Park in 1919.

acadia100np1


Here is an extract from an Excel spreadsheet I created on when the
current 59 National Parks were officially established.

nps100b333xczxczcz


Notice that Yellowstone, the first Park to be established, is now 144 years old. Yosemite & Sequoia, both of which we visited in April, are 126s old.

Yes, there are 3 Parks turning 100 this year, but they are not ‘famous’.

2019 will be THE BANNER year — with the Grand Canyon, Zion and Acadia (again).


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++++ Check ‘Acadia’ tab/page at top ↑ ↑ for lots of other posts & pictures. 


by Anura Guruge

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