Tag Archive | Remembrance Day

Mercury Will Transit The Sun On November 11, 2019 — Remembrance Day, At That.

by Anura Guruge




YOU  will need Eclipse Glasses.


A ‘transit‘ in astronomy is when celestial body passes in front of another. In this case, it will be Mercury passing in front of the Sun — and we, in New England, will have front-row seats for it, and, moreover, it will be in the morning, around 10 am Eastern. The only thing that can spoil it for us is the weather. I will keep you posted.

Given that this is a solar transit, it is kind of like a solar eclipse — like the BIG one we had in August 2017. And as with a solar eclipse you MUST HAVE eclipse glasses IF you are going to look at the Sun. They are cheap enough. Better get some now. I still have mine from 2017.

That it is on Remembrance Day — my Poppy Day — makes it even more special. WOW.


Related posts:
Category ‘Astronomy’.


by Anura Guruge


 

Newly Colorized Pictures Of WW I Armistice Day — 99 Years Ago (Tomorrow).

by Anura Guruge


Poppy Day commemorates Armistice Day,
November 11, 1918; i.e., 11/11/1918.

Start here for a large COMPENDIUM of “Red Poppy” information
— history, significance, traditions & photos.


From the U.K. “Daily Mail”. Click here for original & MORE.


These were lovingly and painstakingly colorized by a Welsh electrician, Royston Leonard (55) — who lives in Cardiff.

Thank YOU, Roy. Great job. [Yes, he is on Facebook.]


There is also this page on Facebook. Click to access.


For those unfamiliar with this
holiday & tradition
please refer to my
EARLIER post.
Thank YOU.



by Anura Guruge

2017 Poppy Appeal For “Red Poppy Day” — The “In Flanders Fields” Video By The British Legion.

by Anura Guruge


Start here for a large COMPENDIUM of “Red Poppy” information
— history, significance, traditions & photos.


Must Watch.

Very Moving.


For those unfamiliar with this
holiday & tradition.

Poppy Day,
also known as Remembrance Day
& Armistice Day,
is Veteran’s Day in the
British Commonwealth.

It is always observed on November 11, without exception since that was Armistice Day — the day, in 1918, the armistice [i.e., truce] was signed the Allies [i.e., US the good guys] and Germany, at Compiègne, France, to bring to an end World War I [1914 to 1918], which involved over 70 million troops and had killed more than 9 million combatants.

The armistice was signed, symbolically, on the ‘eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month‘, 11 a.m., on 11/11, 1918 in a railway carriage in the woods of Compiègne, in northern France. [Yes, I have visited Compiègne and seen the railway carriage].

The poppies symbolize those that grew in profusion across some of the worst battlefields. [Think of French Claude Monet’s ‘Poppies Blooming’ painted in 1873.]

A Canadian physician, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, who was serving in WW I,wrote a poem, in 1915, called ‘In Flanders Fields‘, after attending the funeral of a fellow soldier [‘Flanders‘ being a region in northern Europe in which there was heavy fighting]. The first verse of it went:

 In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

The original poem. Click to ENLARGE.



by Anura Guruge

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