Tag Archive | Hei La Moon

Boston Chinatown Chinese New Year 2014 Celebrations, February 9 — A Snowstorm This Year TOO?

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.2014yearhorseaghny

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Anura Guruge


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If you can’t remember … this is what happened last year.


Click to access Boston CBS original ...

Click to access Boston CBS original …


This is not funny. Far from it. It even warrants a Whiskey, Tango, Fox’.

The gods (and that definitely is with a small ‘g’) must be angry or maybe just trying to be cute.

Two years in a row?

We couldn’t make it down last year because there was a major snow storm.
First time we had been precluded from going in about 4 or 5 years.

Again … this year.

I did hear, in passing, on TV, that the snow might start in the afternoon.
If so I will brave it though Deanna will not be amused.
Like 96% of the storms we get it will be from the south, southwest or west.

If we get an early start, and that is totally contingent on my ability to rouse myself from bed,
we could get there by 9 am. Done with Dim Sum by 11 am. Catch some parades and fire crackers …

Leave by 2 pm. Beat the snow home.


Pictures of Boston Chinatown 2014 Chinese New Year activities
from the Boston Chinatown Main Street Facebook page.

Click to access images ...

Click to access images …


Boston Chinatown Chinese Lunar New Year 2014 Celebrations — Next Sunday, Feb. 9, Is THE DATE.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.2014yearhorseaghny

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Anura Guruge


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From the Boston Chinatown Main Street Facebook page.

chinatownfbfeb91


This is NOT to say that you shouldn’t go down to Boston Chinatown
this Sunday, 
Super Bowl Sunday, February 2, 2014.
Yes, of course, you can.

There will be plenty of activity, lots of crowds
and all the New Year merchandise.

I am sure that there will probably even be some lion and dragon dances.

But, the BIG celebrations will be next Sunday, February 9.

Just keep that in mind.
Don’t want you to be disappointed, as we were, until we cracked the code,
viz. celebrations, in the main, on the 2nd Sunday.

Happy New Year.


Boston Chinatown Holding Marketplace, ‘Lucky Flower Market’, January 27 – 30 For Chinese New Year 2014 Shopping.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.2014yearhorseaghny

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Anura Guruge


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Click to access 'Chinatown Boston' Webpage.

Click to access ‘Chinatown Boston’ Webpage.


From what I can see this is for those that want to stock up for the 2014 Chinese New Year, the ‘Year of the Horse‘, and get all the necessary flowers, mementos, gifts and foodstuff.

There will be a dragon dance on January 27, at 9 am, for the opening ceremonies. The market should be fun. If you are local you should definitely go and visit.

I can confirm that the 2014 festivities,
as I have already posted, will be on Sunday,
February 9, 2014.


Boston Chinatown ‘Main Street’ Gala For 2014 Chinese New Year, ‘The Year Of The Horse’, Tonight, At The ‘Hei La Moon’. $50/Seat.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.2014yearhorseaghny

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Anura Guruge


Related posts:
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Click to access 'Boston Chinatown Main Street' Facebook page.

Click to access ‘Boston Chinatown Main Street’ Fabebook page.


I just saw this. It wasn’t on their Facebook a week ago. Looks like it was ‘invitation only’ to begin with.

It is a fundraiser. Looks interesting.

New Year isn’t for another 20 days! So it does seem a tad premature.

$50 might not be unreasonable. Plus there are a LOT of very rich Chinese. IF I had known about this earlier I might have considered, despite the price.

Hei La Moon‘ is not my favorite restaurant in Boston Chinatown. The Hei La Moon is BIG and has has large, picture windows. Other than that, in my opinion, it has nothing going for it compared to our long-time favorite, and by that I mean for decades, ‘China Pearl‘.

The ‘Chinatown Main Street (Boston)’ Facebook page is still lacking in details as to what will happen towards the end of January 2014 as ‘The Year of the Horse’ approaches. There event page is still only listing events from December 2013!

But, I will keep you posted. Cheers.


Chinese New Year 2013 In Boston: Sunday, February 17, 2013: Lion Dance Parade, Chinese Crackers By The Mile & Dim Sum

Dec2013x125

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Anura Guruge


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Dim Sum In China Town, Boston — The Update — Sept. 3, 2012.
>>
Dim Sum In China Town, Boston — Aug. 24, 2012.


It is Sunday, February 17, 2013.

My earlier assertion that it was on Sunday, February 10, 2013 now appears to be wrong. As I state in the post, I knew it was the 2nd Sunday. Just to make sure I have been checking on a regular basis. Today I found 2 posts that state quite categorically, post-1 & post-2, that it is Sunday, February 17, 2013. That is also when they are having the parade in Las Vegas. So, that makes sense. Sorry. But, I was going by what I could find. We now need to change all our plans and we do have a conflict on the 17th, though China Town will win.


All these pictures are from New Year 2011 in Boston.
We ate at the Hei La Moon which has the big picture windows.
Yes, that is Teischan. Click to ENLARGE.



The Chinese New Year in Boston, with the 3rd largest Chinese community in the U.S., is great fun. We have gone down at least 6 or 7 times. The Chinese New Year, each and every year, spans 15 days. We, oblivious, used to go down on the 1st Sunday of that two-week period. It used to be fairly quiet. Then after talking to a few locals in pidgin English, which I am real fluent in (given that this is my second language), we discovered that: ‘no, no, not this Sunday. Come next Sunday‘. Aaah! The real celebrations are on the 2nd Sunday — and what celebrations they are. Wow, wow and WOW.

We went in 2011 — the day before Deanna went in for her back surgery.

It was beyond amazing. What fun. We saw at least 8, yes 8, different Lion/Dragon parades. We followed some. Saw the ritual with the red envelope and the animal trying to eat the fruit.

And then the Chinese crackers. Coming from Ceylon, from the 1950s to boot, I am very familiar with Chinese crackers. We used to use them with gusto and aplomb when I was a kid. But, I have never seen crackers in this quantity. They were unrolling them out by the mile and I kid you not — and exaggerate, if any, by not much. It was rolls upon rolls. The noise, the smoke, the atmosphere. Obviously China Town has impeccable relations with the City and Law Enforcement. Policemen were just lounging about. It was a real holiday.

And then Dim Sum. Yes, it will be the China Pearl. Yes, it will be crowded. Yes, we will wait. All part of the tradition. The parades start at noon. The fireworks about an hour later.

It is a Sunday, so street parking in Boston will be free.

We couldn’t make it last year. I was bummed. It was the same Sunday as ‘The Wild Swans play by the Educational Theatre Collaborative (ETC) at Plymouth State University and I had bought the tickets in November without checking when New Year was.

I like to celebrate as many New Years per year as I can. Yes, of course, January 1. Then, Chinese. [I am 1/16th Chinese — as you could probably tell from my eyes. My paternal grandmother was 25% Chinese and you could tell that. Very interesting lady. Very stately. Had real bad diabetes — hence why I wait to join the ranks.] April 14 is Sinhalese New Year — and the other 15/16th of me is Sinhalese/Aryan, as far as I know. We don’t really do anything on April 14, and Deanna always forgets. I would celebrate the Jewish New Year, but despite 25 years of extensive interactions with Jewish colleagues and friends I still get so confused by their holidays. I really must make an effort to sort them out.

If you would like to experience Chinese New Year 2013 in Boston, but feel kind of ‘intimidated’, drop me a line or leave a comment. I will try to help out. IF enough people are interested I might even consider taking a group down — and no, I am sorry, but I can’t afford to pay, though I would love to.


Dim Sum In China Town, Boston — The Update

Anura Guruge, laughing, picture November 16, 2011.

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by Anura Guruge


Related post:
Dim Sum In China Town, BostonAugust 24, 2012.

Me with all 4 kids. The baby is not mine. He is my cousin twice removed. So work out the other four.


We went yesterday, to China Pearl, of course. I realized, to my chagrin and horror, that we hadn’t been to Dim Sum since March. Yes, we had gone to Boston in June, but that was mid-week, and to meet my father who was visiting Boston on a cruise ship. That is when we did the interview about Buddhism.

The 2 older kids were able to make it again this time, making it twice in a row that they had made it to Dim Sum. My 1st cousin’s son, who lives in Boston, and his son were able to make it too. [For the record, he is not my second cousin. I researched it. He is my first cousin once removed and his son, 15 months old, is my cousin twice removed. My kids and my cousin’s son are 2nd cousins. Got that?]

So we were 9 including the baby. I had asked for a table for 10 because I expected my son to bring a friend. That was the only bad part about yesterday’s experience. They gave us a great table. Huge. Plenty of room, but it, along with another of the same size, were at the back of the 1st (main) floor dinning room — on a raised pedestal. That was a bummer. The carts couldn’t come right up to the table. They would stop at the steps. Fortunately my eldest daughter, now 23, who has been going to this restaurant for at least a decade took charge; as befits someone who will have her Master’s in Forensic Psychology in a few months. She even went looking for duck for her brother. I was impressed. Matthew, very young, acquired a taste for Peking duck. Danielle got us two plates of Peking duck and two of Peking pork. It is good to have resourceful kids.

Good time was had by all. I ate a lot, as I always do. The kids and Deanna are more restrained. We walked to the Boston harbor waterfront, by the Aquarium, after that. They now have a very nice bamboo park, with a water course, outside China Town, paralleling I-93. It is supposed to be, if you know your nature, a Panda habitat imitation. Very cute. Very soothing. We walked through it twice; once going, the other leaving. It was a picture perfect day in Boston. lots of crowds. Lot of boats. A wonderful Labor Day Sunday. And yes, the parking was free. We parked in the Financial District, underneath the Bank of America castle.

What a Dim Sum check looks like — AFTER they tally the icons at the end. This was for 8 people. So the $100 is pretty good — though I nor my daughter nor her boyfriend had any cocktails as we sometimes do.

Dim Sum In China Town, Boston.

Anura Guruge, laughing, picture November 16, 2011.

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by Anura Guruge




Going for Dim sum, in Boston, in China Town, ‘early’ on a Sunday morning is another one of the cherished family traditions. We try to average about 6 times a year, going more often in Spring and always trying to be there for a Chinese New Year Sunday.

For those of you who have never done it, Dim sum is a traveling buffet where a variety of Chinese food, with an emphasis on dumplings, but ranging as far as crows feet, are brought to your table, on an ever rotating basis by servers pushing steam (or in the case of the sweets, refrigerated) carts. It is Spanish Tapas Chinese style — with considerable more variety and volume.

I can’t really remember when I got hooked on Dim sum on Sundays. [As far as I know, you can only get the ‘whole works’ [i.e., the full traveling ‘circus’ of carts], on Sundays, though nearly all of the restaurants in Boston China Town advertise Dim sum — though the term used loosely to mean a variety of dumplings from a menu.] I think I serendipitously stumbled into China Town one Sunday morning, in the ‘mid-1990s’, while in San Francisco and saw them doing Dim sum — and was hooked; I visiting S.F. at least once a month those days for my work.

In Boston, trust me (and we are experts), there is only one place for Sunday Dim Sum, China Pearl at 9 Tyler Street. It is a side street but you won’t miss it. Follow the crowds — plus it is not that far from the famous China Town arch. From the street it doesn’t look much — because it is not at street level. It is upstairs on levels 2 & 3. You have to negotiate a rather steep staircase to get to the restaurant — but that just gets the juices flowing. At the ‘recommendation’ of some Massachusetts friends, who also do Dim sum, we tried ‘Hei La Moon‘ last year. No comparison. Kids hated it. Never going back there.

China Pearl is where the locals eat. We have been there many times when there have been way, way more Chinese folk than non-Chinese. That is always a good sign. China Pearl also has a small, fixed buffet, serving specialty food like fried calamari and shrimp, in addition the food brought around to your table. There are two levels, 2 floor and the 3rd floor. The 3rd floor has windows. 2nd floor has no windows but has some impressive Chinese artwork. The 2nd floor has more ambiance. Most of the Chinese are given tables on the 2nd floor. You can ask for the 2nd floor and they will give you a table.

We have been there for Chinese New Year Sundays … and TWICE when Valentine’s Day also fell on a Chinese New Year Sunday. Suffice to say they were packed. Lines down the staircase. No reservations. But, they give you a number — but they don’t call out the numbers in sequence. It is still a lot of fun trying to work out who is going to get called. Many time all 4 of the kids make it to Dim sum — and of late they have been bringing along their friends, since Dad pays. The larger the table, more space, more food and more fun. Yes, you can get drinks though I tend to drink the green tea. Danielle, now that she is old enough, likes to order a cocktail.

It is not that expensive, though prices have been going up. Can range from $12 – $16 per head — plus you can, indeed, bring leftovers home. There are no listed prices. They just stamp cute little icons on your check. Then at the end they CLAIM to add it up. I am sure that they scan the volume of icons, the amount of plates on the table, the number diners AND their DEMEANOR and make up a number. Of late I have started telling them, and English is always a bit of a novelty at the China Pearl, ‘to be nice’ when they are adding up the check. Seems to work. Makes them, usually rather dour as only Chinese men can be, smile.

In Boston, on Sundays, street parking is free and if you can’t be bothered to do that there is discount parking for around $9 a day. We usually go straight to the Financial District, next door to China Town, and find a parking spot in what we call ‘Bank of America square’ — since a huge, fort like structure dominates that square. Then we walk. In Spring and Summer it is a treat. In Winter it gets cold.

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