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THE Queen’s Christmas Speech 2019: Video, Full Text & Picture.

by Anura Guruge


The BBC of The Queen’s Christmas 2019 Broadcast
— on YouTube.


From ‘royals.uk‘.


Click to ENLARGE.


Click to ENLARGE. From the U.K. “Daily Mail” @ ‘dailymail.co.uk.’


The Queen, at 93, still looks GREAT. I am so HAPPY.

The Broadcast, per the tradition, was delivered on British TV at 3pm GMT (10 am Eastern).

As ever it was ELEGANT, pertinent, informative,
and inspirational — with the trademark touches of humor.

My Christmas is not complete until I see the Queen’s Speech.

ENJOY. SAVOR. RELISH.


The FULL Text of the Queen’s 2019 Christmas Broadcast.

“As a child, I never imagined that one day a man would walk on the moon. Yet this year we marked the 50th anniversary of the famous Apollo 11 mission.

‘As those historic pictures were beamed back to Earth, millions of us sat transfixed to our television screens, as we watched Neil Armstrong taking a small step for man and a giant leap for mankind – and, indeed, for womankind. It’s a reminder for us all that giant leaps often start with small steps.

‘This year we marked another important anniversary: D-Day. On 6th June 1944, some 156,000 British, Canadian and American forces landed in northern France. It was the largest ever seabourne invasion and was delayed due to bad weather.

‘I well remember the look of concern on my father’s face. He knew the secret D-Day plans but could of course share that burden with no one.

‘For the 75th anniversary of that decisive battle, in a true spirit of reconciliation, those who had formally been sworn enemies came together in friendly commemorations either side of the Channel, putting past differences behind them.

‘Such reconciliation seldom happens overnight. It takes patience and time to rebuild trust, and progress often comes through small steps.

‘Since the end of the Second World War, many charities, groups and organisations have worked to promote peace and unity around the world, bringing together those who have been on opposing sides.

‘By being willing to put past differences behind us and move forward together, we honour the freedom and democracy once won for us at so great a cost.

‘The challenges many people face today may be different to those once faced by my generation, but I have been struck by how new generations have brought a similar sense of purpose to issues such as protecting our environment and our climate.

‘My family and I are also inspired by the men and women of our emergency services and armed forces; and at Christmas we remember all those on duty at home and abroad, who are helping those in need and keeping us and our families safe and secure.

‘Two hundred years on from the birth of my great, great grandmother, Queen Victoria, Prince Philip and I have been delighted to welcome our eighth great grandchild into our family.

‘Of course, at the heart of the Christmas story lies the birth of a child: a seemingly small and insignificant step overlooked by many in Bethlehem.

‘But in time, through his teaching and by his example, Jesus Christ would show the world how small steps taken in faith and in hope can overcome long-held differences and deep-seated divisions to bring harmony and understanding.

‘Many of us already try to follow in his footsteps. The path, of course, is not always smooth, and may at times this year have felt quite bumpy, but small steps can make a world of difference.

‘As Christmas dawned, church congregations around the world joined in singing It Came Upon The Midnight Clear. Like many timeless carols, it speaks not just of the coming of Jesus Christ into a divided world, many years ago, but also of the relevance, even today, of the angel’s message of peace and goodwill.

‘It’s a timely reminder of what positive things can be achieved when people set aside past differences and come together in the spirit of friendship and reconciliation. And, as we all look forward to the start of a new decade, it’s worth remembering that it is often the small steps, not the giant leaps, that bring about the most lasting change.

‘And so, I wish you all a very happy Christmas.”


For more delightful insights into THE Queen
and the British Royal Monarchy
visit their OFFICIAL site.

thefamily



THE Queen, My Mother & The Queen’s Phone Number.


Related posts:
Search “Queen Christmas”


by Anura Guruge


THE Queen’s Christmas Speech 2018: Video, Full Text & Picture.

by Anura Guruge


The UK Sky News video of The Queen’s Christmas 2018 Broadcast
— on YouTube.



The Queen, at 92, looking radiant, extremely engaged & in great spirits.

The Broadcast, per the tradition, was delivered on British TV at 3pm GMT (10 am Eastern).

As ever it was ELEGANT, pertinent, informative,
and inspirational — with the trademark touches of humor.

My Christmas is not complete until I see the Queen’s Speech.

Very impressive, start to the video
— given that I LOVE “Christmas from King’s”.

ENJOY. SAVOR. RELISH.


The FULL Text of the Queen’s 2018 Christmas Broadcast.

“For many, the service of Nine Lessons and Carols from King’s College, Cambridge, is when Christmas begins. Listened to by millions of people around the world, it starts with a chorister singing the first verse of Once in Royal David’s City.

“The priest who introduced this service to King’s College chapel, exactly one hundred years ago, was Eric Milner-White. He had served as a military chaplain in the First World War. Just six weeks after the Armistice, he wanted a new kind of service which, with its message of peace and goodwill, spoke to the needs of the times.

“Twenty eighteen has been a year of centenaries. The Royal Air Force celebrated its 100th anniversary with a memorable fly-past demonstrating a thrilling unity of purpose and execution. We owe them and all our Armed Services our deepest gratitude.

“My father served in the Royal Navy during the First World War. He was a midshipman in HMS Collingwood at the Battle of Jutland in 1916. The British fleet lost 14 ships and 6,000 men in that engagement. My father wrote in a letter: ‘How and why we were not hit beats me’. Like others, he lost friends in the war.

“At Christmas, we become keenly aware of loved ones who have died, whatever the circumstances. But, of course, we would not grieve if we did not love.

“Closer to home, it’s been a busy year for my family, with two weddings and two babies, and another child expected soon. It helps to keep a grandmother well occupied. We have had other celebrations too, including the 70th birthday of The Prince of Wales.

“Some cultures believe a long life brings wisdom. I’d like to think so. Perhaps part of that wisdom is to recognise some of life’s baffling paradoxes, such as the way human beings have a huge propensity for good, and yet a capacity for evil. Even the power of faith, which frequently inspires great generosity and self-sacrifice, can fall victim to tribalism.

“But through the many changes I have seen over the years, faith, family and friendship have been not only a constant for me but a source of personal comfort and reassurance.

“In April, the Commonwealth Heads of Government met in London. My father welcomed just eight countries to the first such meeting in 1948. Now the Commonwealth includes 53 countries with 2.4 billion people, a third of the world’s population.

“Its strength lies in the bonds of affection it promotes, and a common desire to live in a better, more peaceful world. Even with the most deeply held differences, treating the other person with respect and as a fellow human being is always a good first step towards greater understanding.

“Indeed, the Commonwealth Games, held this year on Australia’s Gold Coast, are known universally as the Friendly Games because of their emphasis on goodwill and mutual respect.

“The Christmas story retains its appeal since it doesn’t provide theoretical explanations for the puzzles of life. Instead it’s about the birth of a child and the hope that birth 2,000 years ago brought to the world. Only a few people acknowledged Jesus when he was born. Now billions follow him.

“I believe his message of peace on earth and goodwill to all is never out of date. It can be heeded by everyone; it’s needed as much as ever.

“A very happy Christmas to you all.”


For more delightful insights into THE Queen
and the British Royal Monarchy
visit their OFFICIAL site.

thefamily






THE Queen, My Mother & The Queen’s Phone Number.


Related posts:
Search “Queen Christmas”


by Anura Guruge


THE Queen’s Christmas Speech 2017: Video, Full Text & Picture.

by Anura Guruge


The UK Sky News video of The Queen’s Christmas 2017 Broadcast
— on YouTube.



The Queen, at 91, looking remarkably young, full of pep & happy.

The Broadcast, per the tradition, was delivered on British TV at 3pm GMT (10 am Eastern).

As ever it is uplifting, reflective, inspirational
— and short — speech.

My Christmas is not complete until I see the Queen’s Speech.

Very impressive, very British start to this video.


The FULL Text of the Queen’s 2017 Christmas Broadcast.

“Sixty years ago today, a young woman spoke about the speed of technological change as she presented the first television broadcast of its kind. She described the moment as a landmark.

Six decades on, the presenter has ‘evolved’ somewhat, as has the technology she described. Back then, who could have imagined that people would one day be watching this on laptops and mobile phones – as some of you are today. But I’m also struck by something that hasn’t changed. That, whatever the technology, many of you will be watching this at home.

We think of our homes as places of warmth, familiarity and love; of shared stories and memories, which is perhaps why at this time of year so many return to where they grew up. There is a timeless simplicity to the pull of home. 

For many, the idea of ‘home’ reaches beyond a physical building – to a home town or city. This Christmas, I think of London and Manchester, whose powerful identities shone through over the past twelve months in the face of appalling attacks. In Manchester, those targeted included children who had gone to see their favourite singer. A few days after the bombing, I had the privilege of meeting some of the young survivors and their parents. 

I describe that hospital visit as a ‘privilege’ because the patients I met were an example to us all, showing extraordinary bravery and resilience. Indeed, many of those who survived the attack came together just days later for a benefit concert. It was a powerful reclaiming of the ground, and of the city those young people call home.

We expect our homes to be a place of safety – ‘sanctuary’ even – which makes it all the more shocking when the comfort they provide is shattered. A few weeks ago, The Prince of Wales visited the Caribbean in the aftermath of hurricanes that destroyed entire communities. And here in London, who can forget the sheer awfulness of the Grenfell Tower fire? 

Our thoughts and prayers are with all those who died and those who lost so much; and we are indebted to members of the emergency services who risked their own lives, this past year, saving others. Many of them, of course, will not be at home today because they are working, to protect us.

Reflecting on these events makes me grateful for the blessings of home and family, and in particular for 70 years of marriage. I don’t know that anyone had invented the term platinum’ for a 70th wedding anniversary when I was born. You weren’t expected to be around that long. Even Prince Philip has decided it’s time to slow down a little – having, as he economically put it, ‘done his bit’. But I know his support and unique sense of humour will remain as strong as ever, as we enjoy spending time this Christmas with our family and look forward to welcoming new members into it next year. 

In 2018 I will open my home to a different type of family: the leaders of the fifty-two nations of the Commonwealth, as they gather in the UK for a summit. The Commonwealth has an inspiring way of bringing people together, be it through the Commonwealth Games – which begin in a few months’ time on Australia’s Gold Coast – or through bodies like the Commonwealth Youth Orchestra & Choir: a reminder of how truly vibrant this international family is. 

Today we celebrate Christmas, which itself is sometimes described as a festival of the home. Families travel long distances to be together. Volunteers and charities, as well as many churches, arrange meals for the homeless and those who would otherwise be alone on Christmas Day. We remember the birth of Jesus Christ whose only sanctuary was a stable in Bethlehem. He knew rejection, hardship and persecution; and yet it is Jesus Christ’s generous love and example which has inspired me through good times and bad.

Whatever your own experiences this year; wherever and however you are watching, I wish you a peaceful and very happy Christmas.”


For more delightful insights into THE Queen
and the British Royal Monarchy
visit their OFFICIAL site.

thefamily




THE Queen, My Mother & The Queen’s Phone Number.


Related posts:
>> 2016: Queen’s Christmas Speech.
>> 2015:
Queen’s Christmas Speech.
>> 2014:
Queen’s Christmas Speech.
>>
2013: Queen’s Christmas Speech.


by Anura Guruge


THE Queen’s Christmas Speech 2016: Video, Text & Pictures.

by Anura Guruge


The official video of The Queen’s Christmas 2016 Broadcast
— on YouTube.

The Queen, at 90, looks radiant and imposing.

The Broadcast, per the tradition, was delivered on British TV at 3pm GMT (10 am Eastern).

As ever it is a very homely, personal, poignant
— and short — speech.

My Christmas is not complete until I see the Queen’s Speech.

Very impressive, very British start to this video.

thequeen


The FULL Text of the Queen’s 2016 Christmas Broadcast.

broadcast2016

“There was a time when British Olympic medal winners became household names because there were so few of them.  But the 67 medals at this year’s Games in Rio and 147 at the Paralympics meant that the GB medallists’ reception at Buckingham Palace was a crowded and happy event.  Throughout the Commonwealth there were equally joyful celebrations.  Grenada, the Bahamas, Jamaica and New Zealand won more medals per head of population than any other countries. 

Many of this year’s winners spoke of being inspired by athletes of previous generations.  Inspiration fed their aspiration; and having discovered abilities they scarcely knew they had, these athletes are now inspiring others.

A few months ago, I saw inspiration of a different kind when I opened the new Cambridge base of the East Anglian Air Ambulance, where Prince William works as a helicopter pilot.  It was not hard to be moved by the dedication of the highly skilled doctors, paramedics and crew, who are called-out on average five times a day.

But to be inspirational you don’t have to save lives or win medals.  I often draw strength from meeting ordinary people doing extraordinary things: volunteers, carers, community organisers and good neighbours; unsung heroes whose quiet dedication makes them special.

They are an inspiration to those who know them, and their lives frequently embody a truth expressed by Mother Teresa, from this year Saint Teresa of Calcutta.  She once said, “Not all of us can do great things.  But we can do small things with great love.”

This has been the experience of two remarkable organisations, The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award and the Prince’s Trust, which are sixty and forty years old this year.  These started as small initiatives but have grown beyond any expectations, and continue to transform young people’s lives. 

To mark my 90th birthday, volunteers and supporters of the six hundred charities of which I have been patron came to a lunch in The Mall.  Many of these organisations are modest in size but inspire me with the work they do.   From giving friendship and support to our veterans, the elderly or the bereaved; to championing music and dance; providing animal welfare; or protecting our fields and forests, their selfless devotion and generosity of spirit is an example to us all. 

When people face a challenge they sometimes talk about taking a deep breath to find courage or strength.  In fact, the word ‘inspire’ literally means ‘to breathe in’.  But even with the inspiration of others, it’s understandable that we sometimes think the world’s problems are so big that we can do little to help.  On our own, we cannot end wars or wipe out injustice, but the cumulative impact of thousands of small acts of goodness can be bigger than we imagine.

At Christmas, our attention is drawn to the birth of a baby some two thousand years ago.  It was the humblest of beginnings, and his parents, Joseph and Mary, did not think they were important. 

Jesus Christ lived obscurely for most of his life, and never travelled far.  He was maligned and rejected by many, though he had done no wrong.  And yet, billions of people now follow his teaching and find in him the guiding light for their lives.  I am one of them because Christ’s example helps me see the value of doing small things with great love, whoever does them and whatever they themselves believe.

The message of Christmas reminds us that inspiration is a gift to be given as well as received, and that love begins small but always grows.

I wish you all a very happy Christmas.”


For more delightful insights into THE Queen
and the British Royal Monarchy
visit their OFFICIAL site.

thefamily


Related posts:
>> 2015:
Queen’s Christmas Speech.
>> 2014:
Queen’s Christmas Speech.
>>
2013: Queen’s Christmas Speech.


by Anura Guruge


THE Queen’s Christmas Speech 2015: Video, Text & History.

by Anura Guruge


The official video of The Queen’s Christmas 2015 Broadcast
— on YouTube.

queenxmasyt1

Click to access. The SPEECH per se starts at the 2:26 minute mark. Prior to that it is a quick pictorial preview of the Queen’s year fading into the Victorian Christmas tree theme that the Queen starts off with.

The Queen, at 89, looks amazing.

The Broadcast, per the tradition, was delivered on British TV at 3pm GMT (10 am Eastern).

As ever it is a lovely, touching — and short — speech.
My Christmas is not complete until I see the Queen’s Speech.

Some of the other scenes from this video — at the start.

queenxmasyt2

queenxmasyt3

The Queen starts off her 2015 speech reminiscing, quite touchingly, about Christmas trees and Malta. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert Christmas tree painting that started the custom in Britain.


The FULL Text of the Queen’s 2015 Christmas Broadcast.

“At this time of year, few sights evoke more feelings of cheer and goodwill than the twinkling lights of a Christmas tree.

The popularity of a tree at Christmas is due in part to my great-great grandparents, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

After this touching picture was published, many families wanted a Christmas tree of their own, and the custom soon spread.

In 1949, I spent Christmas in Malta as a newly-married naval wife.

We have returned to that island over the years, including last month for a meeting of Commonwealth leaders; and this year I met another group of leaders: The Queen’s Young Leaders, an inspirational group, each of them a symbol of hope in their own Commonwealth communities.

Gathering round the tree gives us a chance to think about the year ahead – I am looking forward to a busy 2016, though I have been warned I may have Happy Birthday sung to me more than once or twice.

It also allows us to reflect on the year that has passed, as we think of those who are far away or no longer with us.

Many people say the first Christmas after losing a loved one is particularly hard.

But it’s also a time to remember all that we have to be thankful for.

It is true that the world has had to confront moments of darkness this year, but the Gospel of John contains a verse of great hope, often read at Christmas carol services: ‘The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it’.

One cause for thankfulness this summer was marking 70 years since the end of the Second World War.

On VJ Day, we honoured the remaining veterans of that terrible conflict in the Far East, as well as remembering the thousands who never returned.

The procession from Horse Guards Parade to Westminster Abbey must have been one of the slowest ever, because so many people wanted to say ‘thank you’ to them.

At the end of that war, the people of Oslo began sending an annual gift of a Christmas tree for Trafalgar Square.

It has 500 light bulbs and is enjoyed not just by Christians but by people of all faiths, and of none.

At the very top sits a bright star, to represent the Star of Bethlehem.

The custom of topping a tree also goes back to Prince Albert’s time. For his family’s tree, he chose an angel, helping to remind us that the focus of the Christmas story is on one particular family.

For Joseph and Mary, the circumstances of Jesus’s birth – in a stable – were far from ideal, but worse was to come as the family was forced to flee the country.

It’s no surprise that such a human story still captures our imagination and continues to inspire all of us who are Christians, the world over.

Despite being displaced and persecuted throughout his short life, Christ’s unchanging message was not one of revenge or violence but simply that we should love one another.

Although it is not an easy message to follow, we shouldn’t be discouraged; rather, it inspires us to try harder: to be thankful for the people who bring love and happiness into our own lives, and to look for ways of spreading that love to others, whenever and wherever we can.

One of the joys of living a long life is watching one’s children, then grandchildren, then great grandchildren, help decorate the Christmas tree. And this year my family has a new member to join in the fun!

The customary decorations have changed little in the years since that picture of Victoria and Albert’s tree first appeared, although of course electric lights have replaced the candles.

There’s an old saying that ‘it is better to light a candle than curse the darkness’.

There are millions of people lighting candles of hope in our world today.

Christmas is a good time to be thankful for them, and for all that brings light to our lives.

I wish you a very happy Christmas.”


For a delightful history as to the Monarch’s Christmas speech
check out this OFFICIAL site.


Related posts:
>> 2014:
Queen’s Christmas Speech.
>>
2013: Queen’s Christmas Speech.


by Anura Guruge


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