Tag Archive | binoculars

Jupiter Over New Hampshire: At Its Closest For 2019, Next Week; Largest Moons Visible With Binoculars.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE. Base sky map, AS ALWAYS, from neave.com/planetarium/.


Weather Will Permit.

Click to ENLARGE. From: wunderground.com for Central New Hampshire.


Every year, given the orbital dynamics, the Earth and Jupiter are atypically close for a period of around 3-weeks. This year, Jupiter will be closest to Earth next week, i.e., mid-June, 2019.

When it is this close Jupiter is only 365 million miles away. At its furthest it is 601 million miles out. So, that is quite a variance.

It will be so close that you will be able to see Jupiter’s largest satellites with just binoculars. (Jupiter currently has 79 known moons!) Watching Jupiter’s moons is ALWAYS cool and being able to do so with binoculars is a bonus. Much easier than trying to follow them with an ametuer telescope (and trust me, I have).

The weather will cooperate on at least some of the days. So, make sure to check. Showers during the day and still give us cloudless nights.

Enjoy.


Related posts:
Check Category ‘Astronomy’.


by Anura Guruge

Christmas Comet, 46P/Wirtanen, Will Still Be Visible From New Hampshire — MID-WEEK.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE. From ‘wunderground.com’.


Click to ENLARGE.


As happens quite often with us weather will intervene on Sunday — Monday when it comes to viewing Christmas Comet, 46P/Wirtanen. Yes, December 16 & December 17 are when it is closest to Earth. But, that does NOT mean that it will not be there on Tuesday or Wednesday. It will, albeit a bit further out and hence even fainter. So, binoculars would be a good idea.

So, do not despair. All is not lost. OK?

Enjoy. Happy Holidays.


Related posts:
Check Category ‘astronomy’.


by Anura Guruge

How To See Christmas Comet, 46P/Wirtanen, In New Hampshire — Around December 16, 2018.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE.


Click to ENLARGE and admire. From the JPL Small-Body Database Browser.


It is expected to be just naked eye visible. Will definitely be able to see it with binoculars — and, of course, a telescope, even a small one. It will be a green fuzzy ball. There will be NO TAIL per se. So, don’t be looking for the tail. Just a fuzzy, glowing green ball. The green ball should be fairly big — bigger than a star.

For us in New England, the easiest bearing is going to be the easy to locate ‘winter cluster’ — Pleiades (the seven sisters). See the chart above.


Related posts:
Check Category ‘astronomy’.


by Anura Guruge

Restored German WW II Flakfernrohr Binoculars (Flak Glasses) For Astronomy.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.
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by
Anura Guruge


Related posts:
**** Check Category ‘Astronomy’ >>>>


I got this lovely e-mail and photograph, yesterday, from a reader in North Carolina.

Here is what he had to say:
“Hello Anu, You may remember I wrote you a email after reading your kindle ebook on Comet ISON a few months ago.

I had begun restoring a pair of German WW2 flak glasses to use on the comet of the epoc. I finished the restoration before Thanksgiving and i had them mounted on a period Arriflex tripod ready for ISON to round the sun when it bit the dust so to speak. I just wanted to send you a pic of the restoration because you expressed an interest in seeing them. It is too bad ISON didn’t perform for us but perhaps I will get a chance to use them on the meteor shower. The views through these glasses are simply outstanding.

James in NC.”

I had to, with his kind permission, share this with you.


Click to ENLARGE. Jame's restored Flakfernrohr.

Click to ENLARGE. Jame’s restored Flakfernrohr.


Though I, a committed Brit, try to stay away from things German, I kind of liked the idea of these, though the thought bloody Germans using them to harm the Brave Allied pilots kind of makes me cringe. So, I, as ever Googled and found two intriguing entries … one in our favorite ‘How the Other Half Livescatalog.

Click to buy ...

Click to buy …


Click to access ...

Click to access …


We Saw C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) Tonight From Alton, New Hampshire, Through Binoculars, Thanks To Heads Up From Dave Eagle.

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by
Anura Guruge


++++ Search CATEGORY ‘Astronomy’ on sidebar for other posts >>>>>>

>> Update on 2013 ISON & Pan-STARRS … — Apr. 6, 2013.
>> Last ‘Pan-STARRS’ post — Mar. 17, 2013.


C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) fron New Hampshire

C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) seen with binoculars from Alton, NH, on April 6, 2013. Click to ENLARGE.


Dave Eagle, in an e-mail this morning, gave me a heads up that C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) is still visible (though I am not sure whether it is still naked eye). Per Dave, and he would know, it will be close to ‘M31‘ — i.e., Andromeda.

It was more of less where I told you to look this morning. I used those same instructions, which were: For us in New England, that would be low in the Northwest sky around 8 pm. I think trees will be the problem for us. From what I can see from my trusty Sky Charts our best bet would be to start with The Pleiades (the easy to spot ‘Seven Sisters’/Subaru cluster). They (i.e., The Pleiades) should be close to West around 8 pm. Then start scanning North from there. With luck you should be able to spot the ‘W’, the upside down crown, of Cassiopeia. M31, and hence the comet, should be below Cassiopeia.

Beautiful night for admiring the firmament. Not a cloud in the sky. The cold air making everything bright and crisp. We started off on a cleared, abandoned housing estate site close by but it didn’t have enough elevation. So headed up Prospect Mountain Road to the very top. Got to see two delightful porcupines frolicking on the road. Yes, we stopped and watched. Then we turned into Ridge Road at the end of Prospect and parked right at the zenith, off the road. Now we were above the tree line. We used Google Sky Map on a Google Nexus 7 Android 7″ pad to fine tune our direction. Great App. Very easy to use. bang, Right there. Deanna could hold it up and match Cassiopeia with what is in the sky. That helps.

I started scanning with a pair of old, very old, Carl Zeiss, 10x50W binoculars. Took me a while. But then I saw it and I said: ‘WOW’! No escaping it. When you see it you know that that is different. It was rewarding. I saw Hale-Bopp, C/1995 O1, most nights for nearly a month in 1997. That made an indelible impression. I also saw Kohoutek, C/1973 E1, faintly, in 1974, after spending days clambering up hillocks in The Mumbles, near Swansea, Wales, with like minded fellow students from the University, spread over 4 months. That was dedication. C/2011 L4 was better.

Deanna thinks it is the first comet she has seen. She is not sure whether she saw Hale-Bopp. She was thrilled. She too went: ‘Wow’. It was, of course, a first for Devanee. Teischan wasn’t interested.

So this was a nice, welcome warm-up for C/2012 S1 (ISON) later this year. That should, with luck, be more spectacular. 


Where C/2011 L4 was in the heavens when we saw it. It was pretty far away. Click image to access NASA JPL prbital data.

Where C/2011 L4 was in the heavens when we saw it. It was pretty far away. Click image to access NASA JPL prbital data.


Comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS): Where To Spot In The Northern Skies.

Dec2013x125

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by
Anura Guruge


Related posts:
1/ Naked Eye Visible … — Mar. 6, 2013.
2/ Comet First of two BIG 2013 comets: C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS)
>>Mar. 5, 2013.


Comet C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) will be visible to Northern hemisphere observers near the cresent moon on March 12th. This ‘map’ provided by NASA. Click to ENLARGE.


Another image from NASA, but this seen down-under in Australia. Click to ENLARGE. To see it as they saw it in Oz, you will have to stand on your head or turn your monitor upside down.


Another image, again down under. Now you know the drill. Click to ENLARGE. Somehow rotate the image to get the Australian view.


Perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) is today, March 10, 2013. As it turns around the Sun it also crosses the celestial equator, moving from the southern skies to the ones that really count — the northern skies, i.e., US. People are already seeing it — those close to the equator, such as my brethren in Sri Lanka getting early dibs.

As I have said before March 12 & 13 should be particularly good since the crescent Moon will provide a good reference. Try and get to a high point, like a small hill, so that you can see over trees — if you live in the country.

Enjoy. I will try and keep you posted.

Here are two useful links: NASA & Space Weather.

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