Tag Archive | -12

Alton, N.H. 2013 – 2014 Property Tax Rate At $13.44 per $1,000 Is Down By 1.75%

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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Anura Guruge


Related posts:
1/ Alton 2013 – 2014 tax rate — Nov. 6, 2013.
2/ Alton bill Dec. 12, 2013? — Nov. 1, 2013.
3/ NH property tax rates for 2013 delayed — Oct. 3, 2013.
4/ N.H. 2013 – 2014 Property Tax Rates … — Sep. 2, 2013.
++++ Search on ‘tax’ for other posts >>>>


Click to ENLARGE.

Click to ENLARGE.

I called up the Alton Tax Collector and got the rates.

So that is how it compares. Biggest drop, 16 cents is the school portion. The retirement of the Prospect Mountain School building bond reduced a total of 68 cents. Those of you who can remember that far back may recall that in February-March of this year we had quite a few brouhahas about that number because the ACS SAU kept on factoring that reduction in when stating what the new bond would cost us. Read this post and check the newspaper article referenced. So, the school budget did go up, by $0.52 I guess. The -$0.68 help offset it and keep it to -$0.16.

Tax bills will not be mailed until Thursday or Friday of next week, i.e., November 14 or 15, 2013.

Gilmanton tax rate dropped 9.7% from last year. So, if you were looking for a comparison.


Alton, N.H. 2013 – 2014 NEW Property Tax Rate Is Supposedly $13.44 vs. $13.68 Last Year.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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Anura Guruge


Related posts:
1/ Alton bill Dec. 12, 2013? — Nov. 1, 2013.
2/ Alton payments … Dec. 2013 — Oct. 24, 2013.
3/ NH property tax rates for 2013 delayed — Oct. 3, 2013.
4/ N.H. 2013 – 2014 Property Tax Rates … — Sep. 2, 2013.
++++ Search on ‘tax’ for other posts >>>>


clairvoyantThis is per a comment posted against my last post. I cannot vouch for its veracity.

I can only ONLY go by what is PUBLISHED on the State Website. And as I clearly stated,  I checked at 4:50 pm, and included a screenshot, Alton did NOT appear in the list.

I also JUST checked the Town Website. Can’t find rate on it.

Suffice to say the Town hasn’t told me anything though they know that I visited the Town Hall twice and made two phone calls asking for the rate.

So, I do not in any way feel bad that I did NOT know the rate — as a comment indicates.

I have, despite my manifold talents, never claimed to be clairvoyant. You can go check.

IF I can get it confirmed I will let you know.


Alton, NH Property Tax Rate Yet To Be Set (They Tell Me). Bills ‘November 12’ So Payments (If You Pay) Not Till At Least December 12, 2013.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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Anura Guruge


Related posts:
1/ Alton payments … Dec. 2013 — Oct. 24, 2013.
2/ NH property tax rates for 2013 delayed — Oct. 3, 2013.
3/ N.H. 2013 – 2014 Property Tax Rates … — Sep. 2, 2013.
4/ New Hampshire 2012 – 2013 Property Tax Rates Spreadsheet

>> — Nov. 26, 2012.
5/ Alton, NH Property Tax Rate: 23rd Lowest In State! — Nov. 26, 2012.
++++ Search on ‘tax’ for other posts >>>>


Click to ENLARGE.

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On October 23 I was told ‘next week’.

Yesterday was ‘next week’. Town Hall was open for Halloween — which in its self was scary. I also wanted to get out of the rain. So, I went to see the Tax Collector and told her to SCARE ME. She didn’t get it. I had to explain. Scare me by giving me the new TAX RATE.

She tells me she doesn’t have it! What can I say.

Said I would get my bill on November 12. I goofed, because I was surprised (and also soaked from the rain). Didn’t clarify whether that was when they were being mailed or when they would appear in my mailbox. Not that it matters much. We are probably talking 2 days, max., given that it is local.

So, if we work off November 12, payments will not be due till December 12.

I just checked. That would be EARLY. Last year it was 12/17. Year before 12/27.

I guess it was because I was told, way back in July, that this year it was going to be ‘early’.

I will keep you posted, IF I get any new information.

Perseids Meteor Shower, Which Typically Peaks August 12 – 13, Has Already Started. 6 Major Meteors Spotted Already.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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Anura Guruge


Related posts:
>> Gamma Delphinid meteor showerJune 10, 2013.
>> 1P/Halley Eta Aquariids meteor shower — May 4, 2013.

≡ ≡ ≡ ≡  Check CATEGORY ‘Astronomy’ for other posts
—>>> (side bar)


Please check this post for how
meteor showers get their name and how they come to be.


Perseids on August 12, 2007 from NASA.


Perseids are the repeatedly left behind debris from the periodic comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle.

109P/Swift-Tuttle has an orbital period of 133.28 years and was last around in 1992. Its next trip to the Sun, perihelion, will be in 2126. It has an perihelion distance of 0.96 AU (i.e., just inside Earth’s orbit) and an aphelion of 51.2 AU — which takes it past Pluto.

The name, as explained in the post referenced above, comes from the constellation Perseus — where the meteors appear to originate.



From my ‘Comets: 101 Facts & Trivia’ book.

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Click to ENLARGE.



KindlecoverJuly17


This Weekends Much Hyped ‘Super Moon’ Is ‘Special’, But Not Earth Shattering. We Actually Have ‘3’, Yes ‘3’, In A Row!

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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Anura Guruge


Related post:
>> March 2013 ‘Worm’ Full Moon over
>> Alton — Mar. 30, 2013.

++++ Check CATEGORY ‘Astronomy‘ on sidebar for other posts >>>>


The deal with a ‘Super Moon’ is that it is close to full (if not at full) and very close to Earth (if not at its closest).

Obviously we get a full moon each month, or to be precise each Lunar Month which is 27.322 days — rounded up to the ’28’ days that determine women’s cycles etc. So full moons, especially to Buddhists, are always ‘special’, but are really common or garden.

Being closest to Earth also happens each and every month — without fail. If it didn’t we would all be in a heap of trouble! Nearly all, if not all, solar system objects have non-circular orbits. Rather than circular the orbits that nearly everything falls into is an elliptical orbit — i.e., an elongated orbit. The degree of this elongation is referred to as Orbital Eccentricity, ‘0’ denoting a perfect circle and ‘1’ a parabolic (i.e., football shaped) orbit. Closer to ‘0’, the more circular, closer to ‘1’ the more elongated. Most of the planets have near-circular orbits, though they are not circular. Earth’s eccentricity is 0.0167. Mercury has the most elongated orbit at 0.2056, with Pluto, now a dwarf planet, having one of 0.248. Comets, which originate at the furthest edges of the solar system have very high eccentricity, Comet ISON, C/2012 S1 (ISON), having an eccentricity close to ‘1’!

The Moon’s eccentricity is 0.054906.

Here are some cute diagrams from ‘Google’ that will explain this whole notion of elliptical orbits, perigee and apogee. [When talking of orbits around the Sun the comparable terms used are ‘perihelion’ (closest) and ‘aphelion’ (furthest).

How the orbits of comets, in this case periodics which are NOT as elongated as long-term comets, compare in terms of the gas giants.

The Moon’s distance at perigee (which varies slightly from month to month due to some complicated precession motions) varies between 221,324.4 miles to 230,018.4 miles, the average 225,670 miles.

The apogee, on average, is at 252,088 miles.

So this weekend we get both a full moon and one that is at apogee — these two events happening very close together tomorrow morning between 7:11 am and 7:33 am in the Southern sky (very close to the horizon) over New Hampshire. I will be asleep. It will be quite spectacular tonight too. 

But, to be fair we had a Super Moon in May and another one in July — those the in both those cases the perigee was within 90% of closest as opposed to 100%. That is why tomorrow’s is more ‘special’ than most.

On AVERAGE we get 2 to 3 Super Moons each year — keyword here being ‘average’.

This weekend the brightness of the moon, measured per the confusing apparent magnitude scale which goes backwards [i.e., less NEGATIVE the brighter], will be ~ ‘-12.xx’. The maximum brightness of the full moon is -12.92; the average -12.74.

A real picture of the Moon orbiting the Earth taken by NASA robotic spacecraft ‘Deep Impact’, in 2005, from 30 million miles away.

 

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