Archive | October 2019

An End Of A 24-Year Era: No More Taking Kids Trick-Or-Treating At Halloween.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE.


Started way back in the 1990s. That what happens when you have 4-kids spanning a 17-year age gap. The only reason I am not contending 27-years is that I think I had a 3-year gap when Matthew was around 8 and no longer needed I to take him around. Then, in 2003 Devanee came around. I have taken kids trick-or-treating in: New Ipswich, Greenville, Temple, Nashua, Gilford and Alton. I can honestly claim, that in 1992, I established trick-or-treating on Route 45 (the shortest marked highway in the U.S.) between Greenville and Temple. This was rural, with minimum 4-acre lots. Houses were far apart and at the end of long (often steep) driveways. You went from house-to-house by car. If you walked you would, at best, in 2-hours, get to 5 houses. So, nobody had done trick-or-treating on that road.

Danielle was three and Route 45 was the nearest road to us. So, I took her, in a Jeep, trick-or-treating. Nobody was expecting trick-or-treaters. It never had been done. Some were very embarrassed and distressed. There were offers of money and dollar bills put into her pail. Others rummaged around. She got a lot of apples — this being prime apple orchard country. But, universally, there was a consensus that we had to come back next year and that they would be ready. And they were. We had fun.

Up until 4pm today I was not 100% sure that I would not be going out. She could still have changed her mind. She didn’t.

I must confess I was glad we didn’t have to go out today. It was raining quite heavily — though the temperature was blamy, in the mid-60s. We would have got soaked.

So, that is that. No more trick-or-treating.

We had two kids, from the same family, turn up. That was it.

But, this year we had more Halloween decorations than ever before — including our first inflatable. I have feeling that that is going to be the new trend. No more trick-or-treating but more decorations.


Related posts:
Search ‘Halloween’.


by Anura Guruge

The Picture Of The Day (Google Pixel 2) + 6 Also-Rans — October 31, 2019, Halloween.

by Anura Guruge


NO post-processing whatsoever.

Taken with my Google Pixel 2 Phone.

Click pictures to ENLARGE.

Attribution WILL be enforced.

wicked witch New Hampshire Anura Guruge Google Pixel 2


The also rans:







Related posts:
Category ‘Six Images’.


by Anura Guruge


 

Exploring Microsoft’s ‘OneDrive’ As A Viable, Long-Term Solution For My Photo Storage.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE. Where I stand with my 3TB (RAID 1) Drobo.


Click to access my original post from April 2017.


In 2017 I was not mentally ready to have all the photos I take, on a daily basis, stored offline, in the Cloud.

But, technology, needs and my attitudes do evolve. Having the 1 Gig Internet service, with 400MB uploads, is definitely a factor. Ironically, it was my 3TB Drobo getting jostled around during the 1G installation (on Monday) that got me evaluating my online options again. My Drobo going into ‘Data Protection’ mode for three hours to rebuild its storage image was SCARY. Got me thinking my long-term strategy all over-again. I know that trying to keep my photos local, on the RAID I (i.e., redundant-data/data duplicated) Drobo, is far from ideal. I really need to have the photos stored offline, in the Cloud.

I had looked at Google Drive, Google Photo and even Amazon Photo. There way of storing photos did not meet my needs! I store my pictures in folders per my criteria — NOT just the date on which they were taken. So, when I go on a trip I have a master folder for that trip. Then within that folder I have other folders my day, ‘topic’ AND camera! Yes, I always shoot with at least two cameras and I keep the pictures separate.

So, I need a very flexible folder scheme. OneDrive gives that to I. I tried creating some nested folders and uploading some pictures. Works. It seems viable. I still need to do more research.

I will keep you posted.


Related Posts:
Check category ‘camera notes’.


by Anura Guruge

TDS Telecom’s Preferred ‘Speed Test’ Is That From Verizon.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE. From: verizon.com/speedtest


Click to ENLARGE. ‘Fast.com’ from Netflix.


Yes, I know enough about speed tests to understand where TDS is coming from when they rely on Verizon for checking their Internet connection speeds.

Speed tests are fickle and subject to many variables — server speed and distance to the server being key among these.

If the server (i.e., computer), at the other end, being used for the speed test is slow (or congested) you are going to get slower results because the server is not pumping the data fast enough. Even worse on upload testing. Then there is the distance involved. Further the distance, the slower the results are going to be.

Speedtest.net‘, the original gold standard, now, invariably, tends to be on the slow side by 200Mbps (or more). It, as such, is only of use for comparisons.

I use ‘Fast.com‘ often. It is roughly in the right ballpark.

Verizon’s speed test was new to I, but I can understand why TDS likes it. It, more often than not, gives you the highest reading.

So, if you are looking for an Internet speed test you now have the scoop. Hope that helped.


Related posts:
Search ‘speed test’.


by Anura Guruge


The Picture Of The Day (Google Pixel 2) + 6 Also-Rans — October 30, 2019.

by Anura Guruge


NO post-processing whatsoever.

Taken with my Google Pixel 2 Phone.

Click pictures to ENLARGE.

Attribution WILL be enforced.

Locke Lake New Hampshire Anura Guruge Google Pixel 2


The also rans:







Related posts:
Category ‘Six Images’.


by Anura Guruge


 

Tech Steps You Can DIY, And Tech Projects You Need Pros to Complete.

From ‘rawpixel’.

By Katie Conroy

“Katie Conroy writes about lifestyle topics and created AdviceMine.com where she shares advice from her experiences, education & research.”

Investing in tech can be a costly step for small business owners. So, if you are looking to squeeze the most helpful tech into a tight budget, it can help to know which tech steps you can DIY and which require a pro. To that end, we’ve put together a list to help you decide when to tackle tech projects on your own and when to leave those projects to more experienced hands.    

Business Tech Steps Anyone Can Complete

 Setting Up Dropship Sites and Secure Checkout

If you want to add products to your current website or even want to start a web-based business from scratch, choosing dropshipping services may be your best bet. That’s because dropshipping sites like Oberlo make it really simple for entrepreneurs to get started with this sort of web-based business model, and you never need to worry about finding additional space for inventory, which can include anything from electronics to home decor. Already have products and services that you want to sell online? If so, then another tech step you can DIY is to find secure payment systems that will allow your potential customers to use their credit cards or other financial accounts without worrying about their online security.

 Creating Small Business Social Media Accounts

Social media is still one of the most effective online marketing tools for small businesses, and it’s a tool you can use without help from pros. You can use social media to communicate with customers for both marketing and customer service needs. Best of all, managing social media can be a simple DIY task. You just need to spend some time figuring out which platforms are most likely to reach your target audience — everything else can be effortless.

Creating a Very Basic Small Business Website

When it comes to creating your small business website, deciding between DIY or custom-built can be pretty tricky. Building your own site is a great option if you are just starting out as an entrepreneur or if you need a very basic website and you need it fast. If you think a DIY website will work for your business, using free website builders can help you trim your startup budget. Plus, most free website builders are user-friendly, which can save you valuable time as well.

Protecting Private Business Data From Threats

If long-term success is a goal for your small business, then you need to be concerned about data security. Small business data security should encourage entrepreneurs to educate themselves around current online threats, but it should also implore business owners to institute best practices when it comes to preventing data and security breaches. One such practice is the use of two-step authentication, but there are other data security measures you can put into practice all on your own, such as deleting old data and creating a data breach response plan.

Tech Steps That Should Be Left to Professionals

Recovering From a Data Breach or Email Attack

Having a comprehensive data breach recovery plan is crucial for any small business owner, but completing the steps in that plan typically requires outside assistance. For example, if your business has experienced data loss due to a successful phishing attack or email scam, you won’t be able to recover that data on your own. It takes expert data recovery experience from companies such as Secure Data Recovery to correctly and efficiently tackle this complicated task. If you do not have an IT expert on your payroll, you will need to call a data recovery service in order to recoup lost data and get operations back on track.

 Customizing an Engaging Small Business Website

If creating a one-of-a-kind website is a must for your business, or if you simply do not have the time to take on this task yourself, you should consider hiring a web developer. Hiring website help can be costly, so think about what’s most important for your website and your business needs; that way, you’ll know whether to hire a developer or a designer.

Knowing when to DIY and when to get help from the pros is crucial for keeping tech costs low. It can also keep you from wasting your time on complicated tech tasks. So, keep this list handy to make the most of your budget and your time!            

‘Angela Waldron’ — An Award-Winning Writer & Photographer From Maine, Who Works At ‘The Farnsworth’ Museum.

by Anura Guruge


Click to read the original at ‘Find Maine Writers’.


A pretty impressive and distinctive résumé. A Maine lobsterman’s daughter at that — which resonated since this is also the case with my wife. From what I can deduce they are both from roughly the same area in Maine, albeit from different age demographics.

I came across her at ‘The Farnsworth Art Museum‘, in Rockland, Maine, where she is the Registrar. There is a book in their collection that I have been trying to get hold of for 16-years — though to be fair I gave up the first time after a few months. But, I have renewed my quest.

When I was at the museum recently (on our last trip to Maine) I made some inquiries as to who I should now be talking to about trying to get hold of this book. I was given Angela’s name and hre contact information.

As some of you know, I never contact anyone (or respond to anyone for that matter) before I Google them and try and get a read of who they might be. Amazes me the number of people who contact I, via e-mail, my blog or phone, who have no idea who I am and what I do. [When I used to teach, I Googled all the enrolled students prior to the first class. Weren’t they surprised! What used to crack me up was that none of them had Googled me — and many of them were trying to get Web-related degrees and jobs.]

I kind of figured that ‘the writer‘ and ‘the Registrar‘ had to be one and the same, given her degree in anthropology, her interests culture and her location (i.e., Downeast Maine).

I did get to talk to her and she was most helpful. Also extremely modest. She was very reticent to acknowledge that she was indeed the award-winning writer I had found on the Web.

Well, just thought that some of you too might enjoy getting to know her.

So, let me please introduce to you: ‘Angela Waldron, of Maine, writer, photographer, Registrar and one heck of a nice person‘. Oh, a lobersman’s daughter too.

(Our niece just got married to a active lobersman on Oct. 19 which is why we were in Rockland this time around. And while we were at the museum I met a curator who was a retired lobsterman. He knew my wife’s father. My wife and he had quite the chat.)


Related Posts:
Search ‘writer.


by Anura Guruge

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